The 2nd Genetics Appointment: Part B

So a little time has passed and I’ve digested more of what was said and tested for during the second genetics appointment. Also, most importantly, I got my appointment summary. My geneticist likes to keep her opinions to herself. At my first appointment I was told that it is much easier to diagnose something than to take back a diagnosis. This makes sense, but it’s still very hard for me to go so long having no idea what she’s thinking and what diagnoses she’s considering. Luckily, she writes appointment summaries and sends them to my PCP. I get them from him and can then get a better idea of what’s going on.

One thing about this latest report that amazed me is how much she knew about my previous health history. She must have read everything I’d given her last time.  Seriously, she actually wrote out the numbers of all my abnormal CPK tests (probably because I’ve only had like 4 or 5 of them haha). Reading the medical history section is intimidating. Seeing all your health problems written out in paragraph form and realizing that there’s a lot going on is not the most comfriting. “She was found to have tricuspid regurgitation”…”She was diagnosed with spina bifida occulta”…”She underwent an EEG and that was reportedly showing some slowing in temporal lobe”…”She was noted to have extra ribs”…”she was diagnosed with osteopenia”…On and on and on. I swear I’m not high maintenance.

After the medical history part, comes the physical examination write up. One thing you never want to see in a genetics report….

genetics compliment

…is a compliment and I sure got a lot of them. Which brings us to the next and most important portion of my report: the clinical impression portion. She still seems to think that Vascular EDS  (“Given the patient’s skin, joint and hyperelasticity of the skin and excessive bleeding…”) is a possibility but that I also have the presentation of the Classical type. So it seems like I’m definitely getting tested for V-EDS. Lovely. So the prevailing thoughts on a connective tissue disease are that I have V-EDS or C-EDS. She, however, also lists that I have overlap features of Marfan syndrome, Loey-Dietz syndrome, along with other connective tissue disorders. Apparently the osteopenia adds collagen 1 defects, tenascin XB, and Sticker syndrome to the mix.

She still maintains that I have a comorbid disease along with the probable EDS. Unfortunately the comorbid disease is making things rather confusing (“Comorbid entities and a blend of phenotype is a concern in this patient.”) A chromosomal abnormality seems possible. I’m not sure about that myself. I just don’t seem to fit the phenotype for that one, although she does state that it can be variable in phenotype. She seems to be more insistent on the possibility of a mitochondrial disease or an inborn error of the metabolism (IEM) disease. In fact, she even mentioned IEM as a possibility in the primary diagnoses section.

Over all, I guess we’re narrowing the possibilities down a bit more, but I really am impatient (I don’t put the “patient” in patience). I just want to know what I’m dealing with and move on with my life. Giving something a name really makes a huge difference in being able to start accepting it.

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